The New York Times – Social Programs That Work

By Ron Haskins for the New York Times

Washington – Hardly anyone knows it, but since its earliest days the Obama administration has been pursuing the most important initiative in the history of federal attempts to use evidence to improve social programs.

New York Times Speaks About the Teen Outreach ProgramDespite decades of efforts and trillions of dollars in spending, rigorous evaluations typically find that around 75 percent of programs or practices that are intended to help people do better at school or at work have little or no effect. Studies of the early childhood education program Head Start and the substance-abuse prevention program D.A.R.E. show that even when there are benefits, they are often modest and not enduring.

As a policy analyst who helped House Republicans design the 1996 welfare overhaul and who later advised President George W. Bush on social policy, I am committed to the principle that the government should fund only social welfare programs that work. That’s why it’s imperative that the new Congress reject efforts by some Republicans to cut the Obama administration’s evidence-based programs. Especially in a time of austerity, policy makers must know which programs work, and which don’t.

A growing body of evidence shows that a few model social programs — home visits to vulnerable families, K-12 education, pregnancy prevention, community college and employment training — produce solid impacts that can last for many years. Here are some examples.

At 24 mostly rural locations in Florida, Wyman’s Teen Outreach Program works with 6,000 ninth graders a year to promote healthy behaviors, life skills and a sense of purpose. Evaluations of the program, which is based on a nine-month curriculum, show that it helped reduce teen pregnancies and lowered the risk of school suspension and dropout.

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By the Numbers – Teen Outreach Program Impact

Download the Full Report: Impact of TOP

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U.S. News & World Report: Raising Students’ Emotional IQs

While many educators and policymakers are eyeing technology and revised standards to improve student performance in subjects like math, reading and science, psychologist and author Daniel Goleman has a different remedy: Blend in lessons in social and emotional learning that can help students better understand themselves, their peers and the larger systems around them.

Goleman’s new book, “The Triple Focus: A New Approach to Education,” written with MIT senior lecturer Peter Senge, describes how such pedagogical techniques can improve both social skills and academic performance.

Goleman recently spoke with U.S. News about what social and emotional learning might look like in the classroom and how parents can play a crucial role.

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