Due February 1, 2015 – Letter of Intent to OAH

Due February 1, 2015 – Letter of Intent to OAH

According to the Office of Adolescent Health (OAH), prospective applicants who are interested in applying for a teen pregnancy prevention grant are asked to submit a letter of intent as early as possible, but no later than Feb. 1, 2015.

Although a letter of intent is not required, is not binding, and does not enter into the review of a subsequent application, the information that it contains allows OAH to estimate the potential review workload and plan the review.

Wyman strongly encourages those applying with TOP to complete this step.

The letter of intent should include: A descriptive title of the proposed project; the name, address and telephone number for the designated authorized representative of the applicant organization; and, the FOA number and title of this announcement.

FOA Number:  AH-TP1-15-002
Title: Replicating Evidence-based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Programs to Scale in Communities with the Greatest Need (Tier 1B)

Letters of Intent should be directed to the program office at:
Attn: OAH TPP Tier 1B
1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700
Rockville, MD 20852
Phone: 240-453-2846
Email: tpptier1b@hhs.gov

FOA Number: AH-TP2-15-002
Title: Rigorous Evaluation of New or Innovative Approaches to Prevent Teen Pregnancy (Tier 2B)

Letters of Intent should be directed to the program office at:
Attn: OAH TPP Tier 2B
1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700
Rockville, MD 20852
Phone: 240-453-2846
Email: tpptier2b@hhs.gov

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Office of Adolescent Health Webinars Available Now

Office of Adolescent Health Webinars Available Now

The Office of Adolescent Health will host several technical assistance webinars to review teen pregnancy prevention grant offerings for potential applicants.

Webinar 1: Thursday, January 22, 3 – 5 p.m. Eastern.
Opportunity: AH-TP1-15-002 – Availability of Funds for Replicating Evidence-Based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Programs to Scale in Communities with the Greatest Need
Potential applicants should call: 1-888-566-5780
Passcode: 3899321
Net conference log-in:
https://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=PW1052978&p=3899321&t=c
The webinar is only available once it has started.
More information on the webinar can be found on the OAH website at http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah/grants/open-grants.html.

Webinar 2: Thursday, January 29, 3 – 5 p.m. Eastern
Opportunity: AH-TP2-15-002 – Availability of Funds for Rigorous Evaluation of New or Innovative Approaches to Prevent Teen Pregnancy
Potential applicants should call: 1-888-566-5780
Passcode: 3899321
Net conference log-in: https://www.mymeetings.com/nc/join.php?i=PW1052995&p=3899321&t=c
The webinar is only available once it has started.
More information on the webinar can be found on the OAH website at:
http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah/grants/2015%20FOAs/2015-tier2b-foa-info.html

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The New York Times – Social Programs That Work

By Ron Haskins for the New York Times

Washington – Hardly anyone knows it, but since its earliest days the Obama administration has been pursuing the most important initiative in the history of federal attempts to use evidence to improve social programs.

New York Times Speaks About the Teen Outreach ProgramDespite decades of efforts and trillions of dollars in spending, rigorous evaluations typically find that around 75 percent of programs or practices that are intended to help people do better at school or at work have little or no effect. Studies of the early childhood education program Head Start and the substance-abuse prevention program D.A.R.E. show that even when there are benefits, they are often modest and not enduring.

As a policy analyst who helped House Republicans design the 1996 welfare overhaul and who later advised President George W. Bush on social policy, I am committed to the principle that the government should fund only social welfare programs that work. That’s why it’s imperative that the new Congress reject efforts by some Republicans to cut the Obama administration’s evidence-based programs. Especially in a time of austerity, policy makers must know which programs work, and which don’t.

A growing body of evidence shows that a few model social programs — home visits to vulnerable families, K-12 education, pregnancy prevention, community college and employment training — produce solid impacts that can last for many years. Here are some examples.

At 24 mostly rural locations in Florida, Wyman’s Teen Outreach Program works with 6,000 ninth graders a year to promote healthy behaviors, life skills and a sense of purpose. Evaluations of the program, which is based on a nine-month curriculum, show that it helped reduce teen pregnancies and lowered the risk of school suspension and dropout.

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